• Glacier National Park After Dark: Sunset to Sunrise in a Beloved Montana Wilderness is available directly from author John Ashley through his website, johnashleyfineart.com

    New book tells the nighttime story of Glacier

    Here’s a beautiful story about a photography who captures the best of Glacier National Park – at night:

    Glacier Park’s nighttime stories come alive in new photo book

    By Rob Chaney

    To see Glacier National Park like John Ashley does, you don’t have to be a mountaineer or a tour bus driver.

    You just have to stay awake. All night long.

    Landscape photographers lecture one another about the “golden hours” around sunrise and sunset, when the sun skims the horizon and alpenglow gleams on the mountain peaks.

    Ashley’s biological clock ticks to very different rhythms, like moon cycles and magnetic storm pulses. Any Glacier visitor treasures snapping a photo of a grizzly bear. Ashley holds out for comets.

    Comet Lovejoy (C/2013 R1) rises over Mount Brown on a minus 11-degree December night in 2013, just three months after its discovery. Photo by John Ashley

    Comet Lovejoy (C/2013 R1) rises over Mount Brown on a minus 11-degree December night in 2013, just three months after its discovery. Photo by John Ashley

    “The image on the cover is one of Comet Lovejoy,” Ashley said from his home in Kila, where he’s launching the publication of “Glacier National Park After Dark – Sunset to Sunrise in a Beloved Montana Wilderness.” “That comet was only visible during the month of December 2013, and there were only three nights that were something less than 100 percent cloud cover. Those three nights, the temperature was 10 below, 11 below and 21 below zero. I was out all three nights, and I never saw another photographer on any of those nights.”

    That could be because a photographer had to linger four hours on the subzero shore of Lake McDonald hoping that a night fog would clear. But then, Comet Lovejoy only passes by once ever 14,011 years.

    Numbers and calculations hold considerable sway over Ashley’s art.

    He schedules his photo forays by the appearance of meteor showers, the seasonal aspect of constellations, and when those features might line up with park landmarks such as lookout towers, lake valleys or significant mountains.

    Read the rest of the story here

    Where to get ‘After Dark’

    Glacier National Park After Dark: Sunset to Sunrise in a Beloved Montana Wilderness is available directly from author John Ashley through his website,johnashleyfineart.com and wherever Montana natural history books are sold.

  • Roping time. Photo by Mark Edward LaRowe

    Top reader photos: Summertime scenes

    We’ve got quite an eclectic mix of pics for you this week, courtesy of our fabulous readers.

    From the Milky Way above a lookout tower to a set of cowboys doing what they do best, we present the top reader photos of the weeks, summertime scenes style.

    You can always see more reader photos here.

    Sunset near Big Sky. Photo by Chad Tague

    Sunset near Big Sky. Photo by Chad Tague

     

    Starry skies above a lookout tower. Photo by Jake Stufflebeam

    Starry skies above a lookout tower. Photo by Luke Stufflebeam

     

    Rainbows over McGregor Lake. Photo by Yvonne Moe Resch

    Rainbows over McGregor Lake. Photo by Yvonne Moe Resch

     

    Sandhill cranes at sunset. Photo by Whispering Peaks photography

    Sandhill cranes at sunset. Photo by Whispering Peaks photography

     

    Do you have photos of Montana you’d like to share? Email editor@montanamagazine.com with the jpg image, a short description and full photographer information.

    Jenna 

  • Newton Old Crow. Photo by Erika Haight

    ‘Apsaalooke Beauty’ photo project on display

    If you’re in the Billings area today, we highly recommend stopping by the Western Heritage Center to check out the “Apsaalooke Beauty” exhibit of photos from the Crow Nation by photographer Erika Haight. Full information is below.

    Haight allowed us to show off her photos in the July/Aug 2015 photo Portfolio, which we called “Beautiful Connection.”

    • See more photos from Haight here 
    Photo by Erika Haight

    Photo by Erika Haight

    The Montana native and Roundup resident has long photographed Western life around Montana, taking her stay-at-home mom hobby to the professional level when her work began being published in publications like Cowboys and Indians Magazine.

    “Being a stay-at-home mom kind of gave me the liberty to go out and do other things. I got stuck on photography and bloomed from there,” she said.

    Haight’s set of black and white photographs from the Crow Nation, currently on display at the Western Heritage Center, was created after Haight forged a special bond with the Real Bird family of the Crow Nation.

    Haight’s “Apsaalooke Beauty” exhibit will be on display at the Western Heritage Center through Sept. 12.

    It’s an intimate compilation of work gathered from years spent getting to know Crow people and traditions.

    “I would hope that my exhibit would give the viewer an intimate glimpse of my experiences and time spent on the Crow Reservation,” Haight said. “(These are) images that depict the love and respect that I have for their people, and all of the rich cultural traditions that still flourish today.”

    APSAALOOKE BEAUTY EXHIBIT

    “APSAALOOKE BEAUTY,” A FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT BY ERIKA HAIGHT HONORING THE PEOPLE OF THE CROW NATION WILL BE ON DISPLAY AT THE WESTERN HERITAGE CENTER IN BILLINGS THROUGH SEPT. 12. AN ARTIST RECEPTION WILL BE HELD AT THE MUSEUM ON AUG. 7, FROM 5:30-8:30 P.M.

    THE WESTERN HERITAGE CENTER IS LOCATED AT 2822 MONTANA AVENUE IN BILLINGS. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT YWHC.ORG.

    Want to see the whole “Beautiful Connection” spread? Subscribe today!

    Jenna 

  • MT-Mag_JA15-Coverwev

    Our cover shot story: Windmill in the Montana sunset

    Our cover images are the capstone of each issue, the photo introduction that grabs readers and pulls them in.

    It’s a intricate process to pick just the right picture each issue. But once the right one comes across our screens, it’s an easy decision.

    We’re honored to have Kurt Wilson’s image of a water pumping windmill for the July/Aug. 2015 issue. It’s an idyllic symbol of Montana’s homesteading era, is silhouetted against a summer sunset in Broadus.

    But how did Wilson set himself up to get the shot? In a sentence, it’s about taking the time to experience Montana. 

    • See all the stories from the July/Aug. 2015 issue here

    Wilson’s work has taken him down every paved road in Montana and across thousands of miles of dirt, gravel and gumbo.

    roadside wanderings

    He shot our cover image in the summer of 2014 while on a photographic project that took him to every corner of the state.

    In celebration of the 150th anniversary of Montana becoming a territory, Missoulian photography editor Kurt Wilson followed the trail of Montana’s roadside historical markers throughout the state. Here is the complete collection of photographs he made during one-week trips through six regions of the state beginning in April and ending in October.

    • See the entire Roadside Wanderings project here 
    The May/June 2015 cover by Chris McGowan

    The May/June 2015 cover by Chris McGowan

    Here’s where you can view and read more about our 2015 cover selections.

    Jenna

  • Photo by Tom Bauer

    Top reader photos: A salute to Montana

    They’ve done it once again. Our readers are experts at capturing Montana at its best.

    And in this edition of our top reader photos, we’ve got some wonderfully beautiful Montana summertime scenes.

    There’s a few sunsets, of course. And some beautiful bloom, too.

    Scroll down to enjoy. 

    Blooms and bees in Helena. Photo by Terri Garrison-Kinsman

    Blooms and bees in Helena. Photo by Terri Garrison-Kinsman

     

    The Northern Lights near Broadview. Photo by Gary Luce

    The Northern Lights near Broadview. Photo by Gary Luce

     

    Sawtooth Ridge in the Sun River Wildlife Management Area. Photo by Mark Curtis

    Sawtooth Ridge in the Sun River Wildlife Management Area. Photo by Mark Curtis

     

    A storm south of Billings. Photo by Dave Berry

    A storm south of Billings. Photo by Dave Berry

     

    A Bozeman sunset. Photo by Terri Garrison-Kinsman

    A Bozeman sunset. Photo by Terri Garrison-Kinsman

     

    Jenna

  • Flowers and big river flows: Our top reader photos of the week

    They’ve done it yet again. Our readers never fail to awe us when they share their photos from all across Montana – and this week’s batch of favorite reader photos (shared with us on Facebook) is another great set.

    Without further adieu: Here are the top five readers photos of the week:

    Shooting Stars on Waterworks Hill in the Missoula Valley. Photo by Carol Gauthier

    Shooting Stars on Waterworks Hill in the Missoula Valley. Photo by Carol Gauthier

    Sunset at Wayfarers State Park. Photo by Aaron Theisen Photography

    Sunset at Wayfarers State Park. Photo by Aaron Theisen Photography

    A cowgirl at the recent Sort Pink event, which helps support breast cancer research. Photo by Mark LaRowe Photography

    A cowgirl at the recent Sort Pink event, which helps support breast cancer research. Photo by Mark LaRowe Photography

    Great horn owlets in a tree near the South Fork of the Smith River. Photo by Greg Olmstead

    Great horn owlets in a tree near the South Fork of the Smith River. Photo by Greg Olmstead

    Kootenai River between Libby and Troy. Photo by TheBobFactor.com

    Kootenai River between Libby and Troy. Photo by TheBobFactor.com

    We’ve got much more of Montana to see in our May/June issue – out now!

    Don’t miss a moment. Subscribe today!

    Jenna 

    • big buck

      A big buck stays close to town during hunting season.

    • glendive lights

      Street lights in downtown Glendive.

    • hi-line exploring

      Exploring a family homestead near Turner.

    • hogeland

      The American Lutheran Church in Hogeland.

    • hungry horse

      Hungry Horse's mascot.

    • lookout tower

      The Seeley Lake Lookout Tower.

    • swan lake

      The Swan Mountains bathed in alpine glow.

    • two headed  cow

      A two-headed calf on display in the Yellowstone County Museum.

    • zortman

      Somewhere between Malta and Zortman.

    Instagramming all over the state

    In our never-ending quest to explore every nook and cranny of the great state of Montana, we’ve been having fun growing a diverse Instgram portfolio – and it’s been a lot of fun.

    Take a look at this sampling of images above you’ll find on our Instagram page – where we’ve explored everywhere from Zortman to Swan Lake.

    Follow us, @montanamagazine.com, for more images, links and subscription specials. Do you have awesome pictures of Montana you’d like to share? Send us photos that we can post to editor@montanamagazine.com.

    Want even more Montana? Subscribe today to see some of the best photography the state has to offer.

    Jenna 

     

     

    • Buds above the Flathead River. Photo by Robin K. Hao
    • Spring runoff near Libby. Photo by Natatum Haines

      Spring runoff near Libby. Photo by Natatum Haines

    • Plowing Cooke Pass in early May. Photo by Mike Holt

      Plowing Cooke Pass in early May. Photo by Mike Holt

    • It

      It's getting green in Northwestern Montana. Photo by Robin K. Hao

    • First morel sighting of the season. Photo by Natatum Haines

      First morel sighting of the season. Photo by Natatum Haines

    • Robin eggs are the prettiest blue. Photo by George Tillman Photography

      Robin eggs are the prettiest blue. Photo by George Tillman Photography

    Spring scenes: A photo gallery to help you thaw out

    As Montana continues to thaw out from another cold winter, we thought it’d be nice to share some spring scenes with you, courtesy of our great Facebook friends who continually share their images from across Montana with us.

    A special thanks to Robin K. Hao for the beautiful images of the Flathead River and “Getting Green” in Northwestern Montana; Mike Holt for the image of the Cooke Pass plows; George Tillman for the image of the robin nest; and Natatum Haines for the image of the spring runoff near Libby.

    Enjoy!

    Jenna 

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